If you like Dutch wind powered trains, you'll love Melbourne's sun powered trams.

If you like Dutch wind powered trains, you'll love Melbourne's sun powered trams.

As of 1st January this year, all electric trains in the Netherlands are 100% powered by wind. And if you like that, trams in Melbourne, Australia, are not far behind - next year they will be 100% powered by the sun. Photo: FotoSleuth

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter

Meet the renovated, retro, renewable train, crowdfunded by the people of Germany.

Meet the renovated, retro, renewable train, crowdfunded by the people of Germany.

Yep, they’re 100% powered by renewables. This is the world’s first crowdfunded train, which runs one journey per day between Berlin and Stuttgart. It takes a little longer than the regular train, but tickets are one fifth of the price. The founder is hoping it’ll lure people away from long, polluting car journeys. Photo: Locomore

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter

The island of Ta’u has gone 100% renewable!

The island of Ta’u has gone 100% renewable!

Thanks to 5000 solar panels and 60 Tesla batteries, Ta’u, American Samoa, has kicked the diesel habit completely. They used to import diesel, so bad weather meant no power. Now they’re totally self sufficient. The plan is to make the whole of American Samoa solar powered by 2040. Photo: American Samoa Power Authority

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter

Google is going to be powered by 100% renewables by 2017.

Google is going to be powered by 100% renewables by 2017.

Last year Google bought 44% of their power from wind and solar. This year they’re going the whole hog - all of their data centres and offices of 60,000 staff will be 100% powered by renewables. Tech companies now make up something like 2% of global carbon emissions, so Google really are leading the way. Photo: Google.

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter

In 2016, 98% of Costa Rica’s electricity was renewable

In 2016, 98% of Costa Rica’s electricity was renewable

Yep you read correctly, 98%. The power used all Costa Rica’s natural resources - rivers, wind, sunshine and underground heat. For 250 days in the year, they were powered totally by clean electricity. Photo: Everjean

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter

This building gets 90 inches of snow per year. They don’t need heating.

This building gets 90 inches of snow per year. They don’t need heating.

The Rocky Mountains hit -15C at night. Yet architects have designed this ultra-efficient building that doesn’t have a central heating system. There are plenty of solar panels, heat-trapping windows and under-floor motion censored heaters. Photo: Tim Griffiths

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter

Move into this tower block, and your energy bills will be £0.

Move into this tower block, and your energy bills will be £0.

The north London tower block has been touted as the most sustainable development in the world. There are plenty of solar panels, heat pumps and super insulation - so hot water and heating are free. Photo: The Beacon.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter

London’s overground train stations are being transformed into energy gardens

 London’s overground train stations are being transformed into energy gardens

The gardens are brightening up reclaimed land near the stations or tracks and all contain veg, flowers, herbs… and solar panels! The panels power the water pumps, and then they sell the extra electricity and use the money to fund the upkeep of the garden. Photo: Tom Page

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter

New heat networks will provide green heat to households.

New heat networks will provide green heat to households.

To help lower carbon emissions the government are building heat networks across the UK using everything from factory machinery to geothermal to transport systems to heat our homes. That includes the nightmare-ish heat of the London underground too! Photo: tseyin CC2.0

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter

The world's biggest wind farm is going to be built off Grimsby

  The world's biggest wind farm is going to be built off Grimsby

Imagine an area the size of Hull - now times that by five and add 300 turbines the size of the Gherkin skyscraper in London! That's the wind farm coming soon to the UK! And not only will this mega wind farm produce enough clean energy for 1.8 million homes, it’ll also create thousands of green jobs. Photo: Vattenfall

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter

The solar plane just flew around the world on sunshine alone!

The solar plane just flew around the world on sunshine alone!

In July the Solar Impulse 2 plane flew into the record books as the first plane to circle the globe on solar power alone. As well as completing the 42,000 km trip the plane broke a whopping 19 official flight records. But perhaps its biggest achievement is showing the world a future where we could all be flying on sunshine! Photo: Solar Impulse

Share on Facebook • Share on Twitter

Liss school loved their solar panels so much they got some for their partner school too.

Liss school loved their solar panels so much they got some for their partner school too.

Liss juniors, Hampshire, raised money for solar panels last year with our Solar Schools project. This year, the pupils have been fundraising for their partner school, Kafuro primary in Uganda, to buy solar panels too! It’s the first time the village of Kafuro has had electricity. Photo: Kafuro primary school.

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter

China is hitting its climate targets YEARS ahead of schedule

China is hitting its climate targets YEARS ahead of schedule

China’s 2020 carbon emissions targets looked pretty ambitious a few years ago. But things have been progressing at breakneck speed. They’re now on course to hit their renewables target two years early, and their coal reduction targets in 2016-7- four years in advance! Photo: Alfred Weidinger

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter

In 2015, we hit a million electric cars worldwide

In 2015, we hit a million electric cars worldwide

Electric cars have become more and more popular recently - since 2013 their numbers have tripled to 1.26 million. The IEA reckons we'll need 150m electric cars by 2030 and 1 billion by 2050 to help avoid the worst effects of climate change. These are ambitious targets, but right now we’re on track to meet them. Photo: Bjorn Nyland

Share on Facebook • Share on Twitter